April 15, 2014
Ever since this abomination showed up in my inbox I’ve just been sitting here, trying to process the syntactic logic behind “make discovering all we can do happen,” and slowly getting a headache.
(On a related note, if you search for “make discovering all we can do happen,” the HowStuffWorks page on “why do we get headaches?” is the fifth result. Google knows what’s up.)

Ever since this abomination showed up in my inbox I’ve just been sitting here, trying to process the syntactic logic behind “make discovering all we can do happen,” and slowly getting a headache.

(On a related note, if you search for “make discovering all we can do happen,” the HowStuffWorks page on “why do we get headaches?” is the fifth result. Google knows what’s up.)

January 30, 2014
Me against grammar at Full Stop

nonvolleyball:

catiedisabato:

Throwing some serious shade on prescriptive grammar on Full Stop today:

Language can only describe our changing world if we let language change with our world. Sticking with rules that no longer describe the way language is actually used is like stubbornly using an AOL dial-up connection in a house outfitted with fiber optic cables.

I’m at total pedant who forces my pedantry on others for a living—but I also completely agree with this. if you can’t consider the medium, the audience, the message, & everything else your writing’s engaging with, you’re not going to communicate effectively.

This is worth reading. There’s no point in defending outdated rules just for the sake of tradition (or being “right”), and doing so gives editors a bad name.

January 30, 2014
coolthoughts:

transstudent:

Gender Grammar! To learn more, click here!
Click here to repost on Facebook!
Click here to retweet!

yet all the people who make these ‘mistakes’ are obsessed with the ‘grammatical problems’ of using ‘they/them’ as a gender neutral pronoun.

I’m going to be really annoyed at the CMoS if they don’t fully adopt “they” as a singular personal pronoun in the next edition. That construction has a long history in English and it’s incredibly clear. (I respect people who prefer zie/hir/etc. but my allegiance will always be with whatever’s easiest to learn and most widely understandable.)
Anyway, the above info is important too; there’s no excuse for offensive or inaccurate language.

coolthoughts:

transstudent:

Gender Grammar! To learn more, click here!

Click here to repost on Facebook!

Click here to retweet!

yet all the people who make these ‘mistakes’ are obsessed with the ‘grammatical problems’ of using ‘they/them’ as a gender neutral pronoun.

I’m going to be really annoyed at the CMoS if they don’t fully adopt “they” as a singular personal pronoun in the next edition. That construction has a long history in English and it’s incredibly clear. (I respect people who prefer zie/hir/etc. but my allegiance will always be with whatever’s easiest to learn and most widely understandable.)

Anyway, the above info is important too; there’s no excuse for offensive or inaccurate language.

December 11, 2013
I love it when an ironclad argument for the serial comma emerges.

I love it when an ironclad argument for the serial comma emerges.

(Source: Slate)

October 31, 2013

haventreadthat:

Lord above, does the engineer passion for the passive voice make me seem like a brilliant genius copy editor.

If I’m being honest with myself, one of my favorite parts of my job are the times when I’m editing something so poorly written that it reminds me that writing is an actual skill, one that I have in greater proportion than some other people. (I mean, I’m not really good at anything else, and sometimes I forget that I should feel lucky to have a marketable talent.)

October 2, 2013
nevver:

Grammar Grumble Mugs

I don’t actually want any of these (I suffer from mug-surplus as it is), but I very much appreciate the execution.

nevver:

Grammar Grumble Mugs

I don’t actually want any of these (I suffer from mug-surplus as it is), but I very much appreciate the execution.

(Source: underconsideration.com)

September 25, 2013
Why I Stopped Being a Grammar Snob

This is worth reading. I nitpick grammar, punctuation, usage, and style because it’s my job to make sure things are “correct” by a particular standard (usually, but not always, the Chicago Manual). But those rules aren’t always relevant to the conversation at hand, and it’s important to keep in mind that linguistic policing can also be used to silence, sideline, belittle, and oppress.

September 18, 2013

note-a-bear:

pali-princess:

When to use i.e. in a sentence

By The Oatmeal

that actually helps a lot.

This is excellent.

(Another good trick is e.g.=such as, i.e.=that is. Although that only works if you’re the type of person who uses phrases like “such as” and “that is,” and if you are, you’re probably already a grammar nerd who doesn’t need help remembering these things.)

June 5, 2013
When someone corrects my grammar

whatshouldwecallme:

image

Ha! More like:

(There’s not really a gif for “do you really think you could possibly be right about that?” but I feel this comes close.)

June 4, 2013

christinefriar:

This is a public service announcement letting everyone know that the word ellipsis (as in sister) is the word for one single three-dot punctuation mark, and ellipses (as in “sail the seven seas”) is the word for when there is more than one ellipsis. Like goose and geese. Have a blessed Monday.

Yes! See also: parenthesis [ “(” or “)” ] and parentheses [ “()” ].

And apparently there’s no way to present those without creating weird abstract emoticons.  Oh well.